Michael Jackson, PhD, MPH

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“I study the benefits of vaccines and the impact that vaccination programs can have on protecting communities from infectious diseases. I aim to help people make informed decisions about immunizations for themselves and their children.”

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH

Associate Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Biography

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH, focuses on understanding how infectious diseases spread, and on designing and evaluating interventions such as vaccination programs. Dr. Jackson is the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) principal investigator for the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (US Flu VE) Network. Using information from five sites across the country, including Kaiser Permanente Washington, this network aims to provide ongoing evaluations of the U.S. influenza vaccination program. Dr. Jackson uses data from this network to study influenza vaccine effectiveness, to estimate the burden of disease caused by influenza, and to advance the methodology of vaccine effectiveness studies.

In addition, Dr. Jackson is using data collected by the US Flu VE Network to build a simulation model for the spread of influenza, with a specific focus on understanding when new strains of the influenza virus can out-compete existing strains. This work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to improve our ability to correctly choose which strains of the influenza virus to include in seasonal influenza vaccines. He also uses simulation models to predict the impact of vaccination programs on the spread of infectious diseases such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis.

Dr. Jackson is a co-investigator on the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) Project. The VSD, a collaboration among nine U.S. managed care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the world’s premier system for post-licensure studies of vaccine safety. As a VSD co-investigator, Dr. Jackson leads studies of the safety of childhood immunizations and develops methods for using managed care data for vaccine safety studies.

While studying for his PhD at the University of Washington, Dr. Jackson was a graduate research associate with KPWHRI from 2002 to 2007, and then a postdoctoral fellow at KPWHRI from 2007 to 2008. He then spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer with the CDC in Atlanta. As an EIS officer, Dr. Jackson helped lead investigations of whooping cough outbreaks and of the 2009 influenza pandemic. He also designed and oversaw an enhanced surveillance system for invasive Hib disease in the U.S. during the 2008–2009 shortage of Hib vaccines. He returned to KPWHRI as an assistant investigator in 2010. He is an affiliate associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Research interests and experience

Recent publications

Newcomer SR, Daley MF, Narwaney KJ, Xu S, DeStefano F, Groom HC, Jackson ML, Lewin BJ, McLean HQ, Nordin JD, Zerbo O, Glanz JM. Order of live and inactivated vaccines and risk of non-vaccine-targeted infections in U.S. children 11-23 months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2020 Mar;39(3):247-253. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000002550. PubMed

Gaglani M, Vasudevan A, Raiyani C, Murthy K, Chen W, Reis M, Belongia EA, McLean HQ, Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Zimmerman RK, Nowalk MP, Monto AS, Martin ET, Chung JR, Spencer S, Fry AM, Flannery B. Effectiveness of trivalent and quadrivalent inactivated vaccines against influenza B in the United States, 2011-2012 to 2016-2017. Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Feb 1. pii: 5719597. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa102. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Ahmed F, Kim S, Nowalk MP, King JP, VanWormer JJ, Gaglani M, Zimmerman RK, Bear T, Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Martin E, Cheng C, Flannery B, Chung JR, Uzicanin A. Paid leave and access to telework as work attendance determinants during acute respiratory illness, United States, 2017-2018. Emerg Infect Dis. 2020;26(1). doi: 10.3201/eid2601.190743. PubMed

Flannery B, Kondor RJG, Chung JR, Gaglani M, Reis M, Zimmerman RK, Nowalk MP, Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Monto AS, Martin ET, Belongia EA, McLean HQ, Kim SS, Blanton L, Kniss K, Budd AP, Brammer L, Stark TJ, Barnes JR, Wentworth DE, Fry AM, Patel M. Spread of antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) viruses and vaccine effectiveness in the United States during the 2018-2019 season. J Infect Dis. 2019 Oct 30. pii: 5609441. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiz543. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Kwong JC, Buchan SA, Chung H, Campitelli MA, Schwartz KL, Crowcroft NS, Jackson ML, Karnauchow T, Katz K, McGeer AJ, McNally JD, Richardson DC, Richardson SE, Rosella LC, Simor A, Smieja M, Zahariadis G, Campigotto A, Gubbay JB. Can routinely collected laboratory and health administrative data be used to assess influenza vaccine effectiveness? Assessing the validity of the Flu and Other Respiratory Viruses Research (FOREVER) Cohort. Vaccine. 2019;37(31):4392-4400. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.06.011. Epub 2019 Jun 17. PubMed

Doyle JD, Chung JR, Kim SS, Gaglani M, Raiyani C, Zimmerman RK, Nowalk MP, Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Monto AS, Martin ET, Belongia EA, McLean HQ, Foust A, Sessions W, Berman L, Garten RJ, Barnes JR, Wentworth DE, Fry AM, Patel MM, Flannery B. Interim estimates of 2018-19 seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness - United States, February 2019. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019;68(6):135-139. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6806a2. PubMed

Thompson MG, Jackson ML, Regan A, Katz MA, Kwong JC, Ball SW, Simmonds K, Klein NP, Naleway A. Reply to Skowronski, De Serres and Orenstein. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Feb 7. pii: 5308620. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz115. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Rolfes MA, Flannery B, Chung J, O'Halloran A, Garg S, Belongia EA, Gaglani M, Zimmerman R, Jackson ML, Monto AS, Alden NB, Anderson E, Bennett NM, Billing L, Eckel S, Kirley PD, Lynfield R, Monroe ML, Spencer M, Spina N, Talbot HK, Thomas A, Torres S, Yousey-Hindes K, Singleton J, Patel M, Reed C, Fry AM; US Flu VE Network, the Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET), and the Assessment Branch, Immunization Services Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Effects of influenza vaccination in the United States during the 2017-2018 influenza season. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Feb 2. pii: 5305915. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz075. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Naleway AL, Ball S, Kwong JC, Wyant BE, Katz MA, Regan AK, Russell ML, Klein NP, Chung H, Simmonds KA, Azziz-Baumgartner E, Feldman BS, Levy A, Fell DB, Drews SJ, Garg S, Effler P, Barda N, Irving SA, Shifflett P, Jackson ML, Thompson MG. Estimating vaccine effectiveness against hospitalized influenza during pregnancy: multicountry protocol for a retrospective cohort study. JMIR Res Protoc. 2019;8(1):e11333. doi: 10.2196/11333. PubMed

Jackson ML. Use of self-reported vaccination status can bias vaccine effectiveness estimates from test-negative studies. Vaccine: X 2019: 1; 100003.

 

Research Profile

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5 questions with an influenza and COVID-19 epidemiologist

Dr. Mike Jackson has long studied the spread of flu and effectiveness of vaccination. And now… of COVID-19 too.

Healthy Findings Blog

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How epidemiologists predict the future of COVID-19

KPWHRI’s Dr. Michael Jackson describes how better testing will improve our ability to forecast the pandemic’s path.

director's note

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Research versus COVID-19

From clinical trials to technical support, Dr. Rita Mangione-Smith describes how Kaiser Permanente Washington researchers are fighting the novel coronavirus.

research into action

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Can targeted flu vaccines lower the risk of hospitalization?

Dr. Paula Lozano explains how a Learning Health System project finds Kaiser Permanente Washington members who could benefit most from preventive services.

KPWHRI In the Media

New program ensures high-risk patients get flu shots in the South Sound

Researchers developed a program identifying more than 2,500 patients who are most vulnerable to the flu.

K5 News, Dec 2, 2019