Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH

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“I study the benefits of vaccines and the impact that vaccination programs can have on protecting communities from infectious diseases. I aim to help people make informed decisions about immunizations for themselves and their children.”

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH

Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Biography

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH, focuses on understanding how infectious diseases spread, and on designing and evaluating interventions such as vaccination programs. Dr. Jackson is the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) principal investigator for the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (US Flu VE) Network. Using information from five sites across the country, including Kaiser Permanente Washington, this network aims to provide ongoing evaluations of the U.S. influenza vaccination program. Dr. Jackson uses data from this network to study influenza vaccine effectiveness, to estimate the burden of disease caused by influenza, and to advance the methodology of vaccine effectiveness studies.

In addition, Dr. Jackson is using data collected by the US Flu VE Network to build a simulation model for the spread of influenza, with a specific focus on understanding when new strains of the influenza virus can out-compete existing strains. This work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to improve our ability to correctly choose which strains of the influenza virus to include in seasonal influenza vaccines. He also uses simulation models to predict the impact of vaccination programs on the spread of infectious diseases such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis.

Dr. Jackson is a co-investigator on the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) Project. The VSD, a collaboration among nine U.S. managed care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the world’s premier system for post-licensure studies of vaccine safety. As a VSD co-investigator, Dr. Jackson leads studies of the safety of childhood immunizations and develops methods for using managed care data for vaccine safety studies.

While studying for his PhD at the University of Washington, Dr. Jackson was a graduate research associate with KPWHRI from 2002 to 2007, and then a postdoctoral fellow at KPWHRI from 2007 to 2008. He then spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer with the CDC in Atlanta. As an EIS officer, Dr. Jackson helped lead investigations of whooping cough outbreaks and of the 2009 influenza pandemic. He also designed and oversaw an enhanced surveillance system for invasive Hib disease in the U.S. during the 2008–2009 shortage of Hib vaccines. He returned to KPWHRI as an assistant investigator in 2010. He is an affiliate associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Research interests and experience

Recent publications

Jackson ML, Weiss NS, Nelson JC, Jackson LA. To rule out confounding, observational studies of influenza vaccine need to include analyses during the "preinfluenza period". Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(14):1553-4. PubMed

Jackson ML, Nelson JC, Chen RT, Davis RL, Jackson LA. Vaccines and changes in coagulation parameters in adults on chronic warfarin therapy: a cohort study. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007;16(7):790-6. PubMed

Jackson ML, Baer A, Painter I, Duchin J. A simulation study comparing aberration detection algorithms for syndromic surveillance. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2007;7:6. PubMed

Dublin S, Weiss NS, Nelson JC, Jackson ML A response to Majumdar SR et al, Statins and outcomes in patients admitted to hospital with community acquired pneumonia: population based prospective cohort study." BMJ 2006;333:999.

Jackson LA, Jackson ML, Weiss NS. Bias in studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness: the authors reply to Hak et al. Int J Epidemiol. 2006;35(3):799-800. Epub 2006 Apr 17. PubMed

Jackson LA, Jackson ML, Nelson JC, Neuzil KM, Weiss NS. Evidence of bias in estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness in seniors. Int J Epidemiol. 2006;35(2):337-44. Epub 2005 Dec 20. PubMed

Jackson ML, Neuzil KM, Thompson WW, Shay DK, Yu O, Hanson CA, Jackson LA. The burden of community-acquired pneumonia in seniors: results of a population-based study. Clin Infect Dis. 2004;39(11):1642-50. Epub 2004 Dec 1. PubMed

Weinmann S, Naleway AL, Koppolu P, Baxter R, Belongia EA, Hambidge SJ, Irving SA, Jackson ML, Klein NP, Lewin B, Liles E, Marin M, Smith N, Weintraub E, Chun C. Incidence of herpes zoster among children: 2003-2014. Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 10. pii: e20182917. doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-2917. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Kharbanda EO, Vazquez-Benitez G, Lipkind HS, Sheth SS, Zhu J, Naleway AL, Klein NP, Hechter R, Daley MF, Donahue JG, Jackson ML. Risk of spontaneous abortion after inadvertent human papillomavirus vaccination in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2018 Jun 6. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002694. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

 

Research

Chart showing lives saved with vaccination for 10 pathogens

The impact of vaccines: Millions of lives saved

Vaccines given in last 20 years could prevent 50 million deaths in 112 countries

Healthy findings blog

Flu Season illustration young woman looking at phone screen mask and virus illustrations

COVID-19 and flu: What to expect this winter

Answers to 4 questions about COVID-19 and this season's flu, from KPWHRI's Michael Jackson, PhD, MPH.

Healthy Findings Blog

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The next stage in COVID-19 vaccine research

In a JAMA Viewpoint, Dr. Mike Jackson plans ahead to meet the challenges of continuing to evaluate new vaccines.

KPWHRI In the Media

Does COVID-19 affect the flu season?

Flu rates plummet in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic

Verywell Health, Jan. 13, 2021

Influenza

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Flu shot Q & A: Does COVID-19 change our approach?

KPWHRI’s Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH, talks about influenza vaccine research in the age of the pandemic.

KPWHRI In the Media

Flu shot Q & A: Does COVID-19 change our approach?

How effective is the flu vaccine?

WebMD, Sept. 2, 2020