Michael Jackson, PhD, MPH

Jackson_Michael_L_205x293.jpg

“I study the benefits of vaccines and the impact that vaccination programs can have on protecting communities from infectious diseases. I aim to help people make informed decisions about immunizations for themselves and their children.”

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH

Associate Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Biography

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH, focuses on understanding how infectious diseases spread, and on designing and evaluating interventions such as vaccination programs. Dr. Jackson is the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) principal investigator for the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (US Flu VE) Network. Using information from five sites across the country, including Kaiser Permanente Washington, this network aims to provide ongoing evaluations of the U.S. influenza vaccination program. Dr. Jackson uses data from this network to study influenza vaccine effectiveness, to estimate the burden of disease caused by influenza, and to advance the methodology of vaccine effectiveness studies.

In addition, Dr. Jackson is using data collected by the US Flu VE Network to build a simulation model for the spread of influenza, with a specific focus on understanding when new strains of the influenza virus can out-compete existing strains. This work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to improve our ability to correctly choose which strains of the influenza virus to include in seasonal influenza vaccines. He also uses simulation models to predict the impact of vaccination programs on the spread of infectious diseases such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis.

Dr. Jackson is a co-investigator on the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) Project. The VSD, a collaboration among nine U.S. managed care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the world’s premier system for post-licensure studies of vaccine safety. As a VSD co-investigator, Dr. Jackson leads studies of the safety of childhood immunizations and develops methods for using managed care data for vaccine safety studies.

While studying for his PhD at the University of Washington, Dr. Jackson was a graduate research associate with KPWHRI from 2002 to 2007, and then a postdoctoral fellow at KPWHRI from 2007 to 2008. He then spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer with the CDC in Atlanta. As an EIS officer, Dr. Jackson helped lead investigations of whooping cough outbreaks and of the 2009 influenza pandemic. He also designed and oversaw an enhanced surveillance system for invasive Hib disease in the U.S. during the 2008–2009 shortage of Hib vaccines. He returned to KPWHRI as an assistant investigator in 2010. He is an affiliate associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Research interests and experience

 

 

 

Recent publications

Jackson ML, Bellamy A, Wolff M, Hill H, Jackson LA. Low-dose aspirin use does not diminish the immune response to monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccine in older adults. Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Mar;144(4):768-71. doi: 10.1017/S0950268815002058. Epub 2015 Sep 2. PubMed

Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Kieke B, McClure D, Gaglani M, Murthy K, Malosh R, Monto A, Zimmerman RK, Foppa IM, Flannery B, Thompson MG. Incidence of medically attended influenza infection and cases averted by vaccination, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 influenza seasons. Vaccine. 2015 Sep 22;33(39):5181-7. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.07.098. Epub 2015 Aug 11. PubMed

Jackson ML, Peterson D, Nelson JC, Greene SK, Jacobsen SJ, Belongia EA, Baxter R, Jackson LA. Using winter 2009-2010 to assess the accuracy of methods which estimate influenza-related morbidity and mortality. Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Aug;143(11):2399-407. doi: 10.1017/S0950268814003276. Epub 2014 Dec 12.

McLean HQ, Thompson MG, Sundaram ME, Kieke VA, Gaglani M, Murthy K, Piedra PA, Zimmerman RK, Nowalk MP, Raviotta JM, Jackson ML, Jackson L, Ohmit SE, Petrie JG, Monto AS, Meece JK, Thaker SN, Clippard JR, Spencer SM, Fry AM, Belongia EA. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in the United States during 2012-13: variable protection by age and virus type. J Infect Dis. 2015 May 15;211(10):1529-40. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiu647. Epub 2014 Nov 18. PubMed

Jackson ML, Rothman KJ. Effects of imperfect test sensitivity and specificity on observational studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness. Vaccine. 2015 Mar 10;33(11):1313-6. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.069. Epub 2015 Feb 7. PubMed

Havers FP, Flannery B, Clippard JR, Gaglani M, Zimmerman RK, Jackson LA, Petrie JG, McLean HQ, Nowalk MP, Jackson ML, Monto AS, Belongia EA, Eng HF, Lamerato L, Campbell AP, Fry AM. Use of influenza antiviral medications among outpatients at high risk for influenza-associated complications during the 2013-14 influenza season. Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Jun 1;60(11):1677-80. doi: 10.1093/cid/civ146. Epub 2015 Feb 25. PubMed

Flannery B, Clippard J, Zimmerman RK, Nowalk MP, Jackson ML, Jackson LA, Monto AS, Petrie JG, McLean HQ, Belongia EA, Gaglani M, Berman L, Foust A, Sessions W, Thaker SN, Spencer S, Fry AM. Early estimates of seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness - United States, January 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(1):10-5. PubMed

Abrams JY, Weintraub ES, Baggs JM, McCarthy NL, Schonberger LB, Lee GM, Klein NP, Belongia EA, Jackson ML, Naleway AL, Nordin JD, Hambidge SJ, Belay ED. Childhood vaccines and Kawasaki disease, Vaccine Safety Datalink, 1996-2006. Vaccine. 2015;33(2):382-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.10.044. Epub 2014 Nov 4. PubMed

Kharbanda EO, Vazquez-Benitez G, Lipkind HS, Klein NP, Cheetham TC, Naleway A, Omer SB, Hambidge SJ, Lee GM, Jackson ML, McCarthy NL, DeStefano F, Nordin JD. Evaluation of the association of maternal pertussis vaccination with obstetric events and birth outcomes. JAMA. 2014;312(18):1897-904. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.14825. PubMed

Jackson ML. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in elderly people. Lancet Infect Dis. 2014 12(14):1169-70. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(08)61345-8.

 

research into action

Flu-vaccination-elderly-patients_1col.jpg

Can targeted flu vaccines lower the risk of hospitalization?

Dr. Paula Lozano explains how a Learning Health System project finds Kaiser Permanente Washington members who could benefit most from preventive services.

healthy findings blog

Flu-season-office_1col.jpg

As flu season ramps up, vaccination offers protection

New KPWHRI study helps confirm national guidelines that encourage people with high-risk conditions to get the shot.

Read more in Healthy Findings.

Live Healthy

flu-shot-smile-black-male-1col.jpg

Flu shots boost your chances of staying well

While flu vaccine effectiveness varies year to year, it still makes sense to get immunized annually.

Read about it in Live Healthy.

kpwhri in the media

Are we prepared for the next flu pandemic?

U.S. News & World Report, Jan 18, 2018