Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., so I'm studying how genes, medications, and everyday behaviors influence heart health.”

Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD

Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Professor, Medicine - General Internal Medicine, University of Washington
Professor, Epidemiology, University of Washington
Adjunct Professor, Health Services, University of Washington

Areas of focus:

Biography

Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD, is a general internist and cardiovascular disease epidemiologist with interests and expertise in pharmaco-epidemiology, pharmacogenetics, genomics, and drug safety. Also a professor of medicine, epidemiology, and health services at the University of Washington (UW), he co-directs the UW’s Cardiovascular Health Research Unit.

Dr. Psaty’s work includes population-based case-control studies of myocardial infarction, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolism conducted at Kaiser Permanente Washington. His primary research interests include:

  • risk factors such as high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and diabetes and the risks and benefits of the drugs used to treat them;
  • new or emerging risk factors for heart disease and stroke;
  • genetics, genomics, and pharmacogenetics; and
  • genetic risk factors for various conditions.

His several current National Institutes of Health-funded projects involve largescale collaborative discovery efforts and use genetics to understand the human biology of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors. He is a founding member of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium (CHARGE), which conducts genome-wide association studies in collaborating cohorts, including the Cardiovascular Health Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). He also teaches and mentors students, fellows, and junior faculty in medicine and epidemiology.

A national leader in encouraging better postmarket surveillance of approved medications, Dr. Psaty was a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Science Board (2011-2018), a committee that advises the commissioner and chief scientist. He previously served on two National Academy of Medicine (NAM) panels charged with reviewing the FDA, most recently the ethical and scientific issues in studying the safety of approved drugs. Dr. Psaty recently served as a member of NHLBI’s Advisory Council, and is a member of the NHLBI’s Board of External Experts. In 2013, he was elected to the NAM and designated a distinguished scientist by the American Heart Association.

For many years, Dr. Psaty maintained a small primary care practice in the Adult Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center.

Research interests and experience

  • Cardiovascular Health

    Myocardial infarction and stroke; venous thrombosis; atrial fibrillation; and risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes

  • Medication Use & Patient Safety

    Pharmaco-epidemiology; drug safety

  • Genetics, Genomics, and Pharmacogenetics

  • Epidemiologic Methods

     

Recent publications

Carr DF, Francis B, Jorgensen AL, Zhang E, Chinoy H, Heckbert SR, Bis JC, Brody JA, Floyd J, Psaty BM, Molokhia M, Lapeyre-Mestre M, Conforti A, Alfirevic A, van Staa T, Pirmohamed M. Genome-wide association study of statin-induced myopathy in patients recruited using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2019 Jun 20. doi: 10.1002/cpt.1557. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Dashti HS, Merino J, Lane JM, Song Y, Smith CE, Tanaka T, McKeown NM, Tucker C, Sun D, Bartz TM, Li-Gao R, Nisa H, Reutrakul S, Lemaitre RN, Alshehri TM, de Mutsert R, Bazzano L, Qi L, Knutson KL, Psaty BM, Mook-Kanamori DO, Perica VB, Neuhouser ML, Scheer FAJL, Rutter MK, Garaulet M, Saxena R. Genome-wide association study of breakfast skipping links clock regulation with food timing. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Jun 13. pii: 5514151. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqz076. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Psaty BM, Fleming TR. Cardiovascular safety trials of antidiabetic therapies to treat type 2 diabetes:perhaps asking the wrong question? Am J Hypertens. 2019 Jun 7. pii: 5512981. doi: 10.1093/ajh/hpz093. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Jorgensen ME, Kang HM, Kelsey M, Kim BJ, Koistinen HA, Kuusisto J, Leader JB, Linneberg A, Liu CT, Liu J, Lyssenko V, Manning AK, Marcketta A, Malacara-Hernandez JM, Martinez-Hernandez A, Matsuo K, Mayer-Davis E, Mendoza-Caamal E, Mohlke KL, Morrison+++. Exome sequencing of 20,791 cases of type 2 diabetes and 24,440 controls. Nature. 2019;570(7759):71-76. doi: 10.1038/s41586-019-1231-2. Epub 2019 May 22. PubMed

 

improving care

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Healthy Hearts Northwest is helping patients receive better care for cardiovascular conditions thanks to collaborators like Dr. L.J. Fagnan.

medication safety

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Using phentermine for weight loss longer term found to be safe, effective

Dr. David Arterburn discusses reassuring news from his PCORnet study of the most widely used anti-obesity drug in the United States.

aging & geriatrics

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Do drugs cause falls for adults with dementia?

Researchers find a relationship between prescribed central nervous system-active medications and increased risk of falling among older people with dementia.