Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., so I'm studying how genes, medications, and everyday behaviors influence heart health.”

Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD

Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Areas of focus:

Biography

Bruce Psaty is a general internist and cardiovascular disease epidemiologist with interests and expertise in pharmaco-epidemiology, pharmacogenetics, and drug safety. Also a professor of medicine, epidemiology, and health services at the University of Washington (UW), he co-directs the UW’s Cardiovascular Health Research Unit.

Dr. Psaty’s work includes population-based case-control studies of myocardial infarction, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolism conducted at Kaiser Permanente Washington. His primary research interests include risk factors such as high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and diabetes and the drugs used to treat these conditions; new or emerging risk factors for heart disease and stroke; genetics, genomics, and pharmacogenetics; and genetic risk factors for a variety of conditions.

His several current NIH-funded projects focus on interactions between medications and genes; they represent efforts to translate findings from the Human Genome Project into clinical practice and, thus, improve the safety and efficacy of commonly used medications. He is a founding member of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium (CHARGE), which conducts genome-wide association studies in collaborating cohorts, including the Cardiovascular Health Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. He also teaches and mentors students, fellows, and junior faculty in medicine and epidemiology.

A national leader in encouraging better postmarket surveillance of approved medications, Dr. Psaty is a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Science Board, a committee that advises the commisioner and chief scientist. He previously served on two Institute of Medicine (IOM) panels charged with reviewing the FDA, most recently the ethical and scientific issues in studying the safety of approved drugs. Dr. Psaty is also a member of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Advisory Council. In 2013, he was elected to the IOM and designated a distinguished scientist by the American Heart Association.

Dr. Psaty maintains a small but long-standing primary care practice in the Adult Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center.

Research interests and experience

  • Cardiovascular Health

    Myocardial infarction and stroke; venous thrombosis; atrial fibrillation; and risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes

  • Medication Use & Patient Safety

    Pharmaco-epidemiology; drug safety

  • Genetics, Genomics, and Pharmacogenetics

  • Epidemiologic Methods

     

Recent publications

Hobbs BD, de Jong K, Lamontagne M, Bossé Y, Shrine N, Artigas MS, Wain LV, Hall IP, Jackson VE, Wyss AB, London SJ, North KE, Franceschini N, Strachan DP, Beaty TH, Hokanson JE, Crapo JD, Castaldi PJ, Chase RP, Bartz TM, Heckbert SR, Psaty BM, Gharib SA, Zanen P, Lammers JW, Oudkerk M, Groen HJ, Locantore N, Tal-Singer R, Rennard SI, Vestbo J, Timens W, Paré PD, Latourelle JC, Dupuis J, O'Connor GT, Wilk JB, Kim WJ, Lee MK, Oh YM, Vonk JM, de Koning HJ, Leng S, Belinsky SA, Tesfaigzi Y, Manichaikul A, Wang XQ, Rich SS, Barr RG, Sparrow D, Litonjua AA, Bakke P, Gulsvik A, Lahousse L, Brusselle GG, Stricker BH, Uitterlinden AG, Ampleford EJ, Bleecker ER, Woodruff PG, Meyers DA, Qiao D, Lomas DA, Yim JJ, Kim DK, Hawrylkiewicz I, Sliwinski P, Hardin M, Fingerlin TE, Schwartz DA, Postma DS, MacNee W, Tobin MD, Silverman EK, Boezen HM, Cho MH, COPDGene Investigators, ECLIPSE Investigators, LifeLines Investigators, SPIROMICS Research Group, International COPD Genetics Network Investigators, UK BiLEVE Investigators, International COPD Genetics Consortium. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis. Nat Genet. 2017 Feb 6. doi: 10.1038/ng.3752. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Hughes-Austin JM, Rifkin DE, Beben T, Katz R, Sarnak MJ, Deo R, Hoofnagle AN, Homma S, Siscovick DS, Sotoodehnia N, Psaty BM, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum B, Shlipak MG, Ix JH. The relation of serum potassium concentration with cardiovascular events and mortality in community-living individuals. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017 Feb 7;12(2):245-252. doi: 10.2215/CJN.06290616. Epub 2017 Jan 31. PubMed

de Vries PS, Sabater-Lleal M, Chasman DI, Trompet S, Ahluwalia TS, Teumer A, Kleber ME, Chen MH, Wang JJ, Attia JR, Marioni RE, Steri M, Weng LC, Pool R, Grossmann V, Brody JA, Venturini C, Tanaka T, Rose LM, Oldmeadow C, Mazur J, Basu S, Frånberg M, Yang Q, Ligthart S, Hottenga JJ, Rumley A, Mulas A, de Craen AJ, Grotevendt A, Taylor KD, Delgado GE, Kifley A, Lopez LM, Berentzen TL, Mangino M, Bandinelli S, Morrison AC, Hamsten A, Tofler G, de Maat MP, Draisma HH, Lowe GD, Zoledziewska M, Sattar N, Lackner KJ, Völker U, McKnight B, Huang J, Holliday EG, McEvoy MA, Starr JM, Hysi PG, Hernandez DG, Guan W, Rivadeneira F, McArdle WL, Slagboom PE, Zeller T, Psaty BM, Uitterlinden AG, de Geus EJ, Stott DJ, Binder H, Hofman A, Franco OH, Rotter JI, Ferrucci L, Spector TD, Deary IJ, März W, Greinacher A, Wild PS, Cucca F, Boomsma DI, Watkins H, Tang W, Ridker PM, Jukema JW, Scott RJ, Mitchell P, Hansen T, O'Donnell CJ, Smith NL, Strachan DP, Dehghan A. Comparison of hapmap and 1000 genomes reference panels in a large-scale genome-wide association study. PLoS One. 2017 Jan 20;12(1):e0167742. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0167742. eCollection 2017. PubMed

Appiah D, Fashanu OE, Heckbert SR, Cushman M, Psaty BM, Folsom AR. Relation of coagulation factor XI with incident coronary heart disease and stroke: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2016 Dec 22. doi: 10.1097/MBC.0000000000000616. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

 

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