test

Events

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute hosts regular seminars where our scientists and collaborators present their research findings.

All are welcome.

Left: Senior Investigator David Arterburn, MD, MPH

Upcoming seminars and events

 


July 25, 2017

How to make a picture worth a thousand words: Effectively communicating your research results using statistical graphics

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenters

  • Mike Jackson, Associate Scientific Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

  • Yates Coley, Assistant Scientific Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Summary
Statistical graphics can also be powerful tools for communicating our study findings. While statistical software makes it easy to produce standard figures, default options often leave much to be desired and can produce figures that distract, confuse, or even distort data.

In this workshop, participants will learn the fundamentals of effective data visualization and how to apply these best practices to create their own graphics. We will begin by reviewing general principles for displaying data, enabling viewers to make comparisons and identify trends and correlations. We will then show how to put these principles into practice, such as creating charts that are appropriate for a given dataset and the effective use of color, size, and annotation. We will also walk through techniques for going beyond the default settings of some software packages to produce well-designed figures.

 


July 25, 2017

Book reading & signing—Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life by Eric B. Larson

Where: Third Place Books at Lake Forest Park Town Center, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., Lake Forest Park, Wash., 7 p.m.

Presenter: Eric B. Larson, MD, MP, vice president of research and health care innovation, KPWA; executive director and senior investigator, KPWHRI

Presenting: His new book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life

Based largely on more than 30 years of research among KP Washington seniors in the Institute’s ACT study, this book proposes a path for growing old with resilience and foresight.  For more information about book and other related events in August, visit the Enlightened Aging website

 


Aug. 16, 2017

Book reading & signing—Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life by Eric B. Larson

WhereThe Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Avenue (Between Pike and Pine), Seattle, Wash., 7 p.m.

Presenter: Eric B. Larson, MD, MP, vice president of research and health care innovation, KPWA; executive director and senior investigator, KPWHRI

Presenting: His new book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life

Based largely on more than 30 years of research among KP Washington seniors in the Institute’s ACT study, this book proposes a path for growing old with resilience and foresight.  For more information about book and other related events in August, visit the Enlightened Aging website

 


Aug. 17, 2017

Book reading & signing—Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life by Eric B. Larson

Where: Queen Anne Book Company, 1811 Queen Anne Avenue N., Seattle, Wash., 7 p.m.

Presenter: Eric B. Larson, MD, MP, vice president of research and health care innovation, KPWA; executive director and senior investigator, KPWHRI

Presenting: His new book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life

Based largely on more than 30 years of research among KP Washington seniors in the Institute’s ACT study, this book proposes a path for growing old with resilience and foresight.  For more information about book and other related events in August, visit the Enlightened Aging website


Past Events

 


July 19, 2017

Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in Research: Strategies for Initiating Research Partnerships

Where: Webinar  July 19, 2017, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PDT

Presenters: 

  • Karen Wernli, PhD, MS (PI) Associate Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
  • Dianne Johnson, Patient Partner

Summary
This webinar will highlight ways to find and initiate partnerships for patient-centered research. PCORI staff will share strategies reported by PCORI awardees, applicants, and research partners. Research teams from current PCORI-funded projects will explain how they formed their partnerships and share challenges and lessons learned from their projects.

Learn more & register by visiting the PCORI events page for this event.

 


July 17, 2017

Screening, Prevention and Early Diagnosis of Cancer

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenter: Dr. Stephanie Smits, Research Associate, Division of Population Medicine, Cardiff University

Summary
The Screening, Prevention and Early Diagnosis (SPED) team focuses on significant public health problems and inequalities in Wales. Their work focuses on exploring the motivational and behavioral aspects influencing early presentation to inform the design of interventions to improve screening outcomes and to expedite early symptomatic diagnosis. Their work also aims to improve understanding of inequalities in cancer awareness and uptake in screening programs in high risk, harder to reach groups.

SPED involves patients and members of the public in developing, evaluating and implementing novel, person-centered interventions designed to improve Screening, Prevention and Early Diagnosis. Dr. Smits will give a brief overview of the work conducted within the SPED team, including community cancer awareness interventions, lung cancer early detection and prevention, and interventions for primary care physician to improve cancer knowledge and early diagnosis. She will then present her own research interests and ideas, including different projects on bowel cancer.

Coffee and tea will be provided.

 


July 11, 2017

The Health Promotion Research Center: Overview and Reaching Employees in Small, Low-wage Worksites

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenter: Peggy Hannon, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, University of Washington School of Public Health, and Director, Health Promotion Research Center, a CDC Prevention Research Center.

Summary
This presentation will first provide an overview of the Health Promotion Research Center (HPRC), a CDC Prevention Research Center based at the University of Washington since 1986. Dr. Hannon will describe the mission and research foci of the center. She will then describe one of HPRC’s programs of research, disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices to small worksites in low-wage industries. The presentation will include a description of a randomized trial of 70 work sites in King County.

 


June 27, 2017

Excellence in Primary Care: Lessons from Exceptional Practices

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenters

  • Brian Austin, Associate Director, MacColl Center for Health Care Innovation
  • Clarissa Hsu, Assistant Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
  • DeAnn Cromp, Research Associate, Center for Community Health and Evaluation
  • Ed Wagner, Director Emeritus, MacColl Center for Health Care Innovation

Summary
PCT-LEAP (The Primary Care Team: Learning from Effective Ambulatory Practices) is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. There is growing recognition that excellence in primary care depends upon an effective team, yet there is little empiric evidence about the composition of optimal care teams or how they are deployed. In response, PCT-LEAP has tried to fill this gap through the careful selection and study of 30 high-performing American primary care practices that are innovative in their use of their workforce. In the seminar, we will share lessons learned and insights obtained from our studies of these practices.

 


June 13, 2017

Improving Medication Adherence: Keep Your Eyes on the Prize 

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenter: Zachary A. Marcum, PharmD, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Washington, School of Pharmacy

Summary

Dr. Marcum will discuss existing knowledge on the measurement of medication adherence, effective strategies for improving medication adherence, and some of the challenges with conducting research on medication adherence. He will present preliminary results from his K12 career development award, which is a partnership with the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) Study at KPWHRI.

Coffee and tea will be served.

 


June 2, 2017

Kaiser Permanente Senior Caucus Meeting 

Where: Kaiser Permanente Capitol Hill campus main building, Sixth floor Sound View Room, 201 16th Ave. E., Seattle, Wash., 10:30 a.m. to noon. 

Dr. Eric Larson will discuss his book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for a Long, Active Life. 

Based largely on his decades of research among Kaiser Permanente Washington seniors, the book offers practical advice for staving off disability until very old age. Steps include being proactive, accepting changes that come with age, and building strong physical, mental, and social reserves for a long, active life. 

A expert in the science of aging, Dr. Larson leads the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, one of the world’s largest and longest studies aimed at preventing dementia. He is vice president for research and health care innovation at Kaiser Permanente Washington and executive director of Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI). He is also professor of medicine and health services at the University of Washington. 

All are welcome.


May 24, 2017

Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Unique Opportunities for Disseminating, Implementing, and Sustaining Evidence-Based Practices into Clinical Care

Where: National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, Wednesday, May 24 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

Workshop and videocast: Register here

The workshop is based on the lessons learned from nine pragmatic trials initiated through the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory, which is funded by the NIH Common Fund. Topics addressed included suicide prevention, colorectal cancer screening, care for back pain, advanced care planning, reducing hospital infections, and more.

Speakers for the workshop will include academic researchers and health system partners from across the country and other leaders from Kaiser Permanente, including:

  • Kaiser Permanente Washington President Susan Mullaney, MHA;
  • Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) Senior Investigator Gregory Simon, MD, MPH;
  • Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s Senior Investigators Gloria Coronado, PhD, and
  • Lynn DeBar, PhD, MPH.

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, vice president for research and health care innovation for Kaiser Permanente Washington and executive director of KPWHRI, will serve as a moderator and leads the team that organized the NIH workshop with collaboration from Catherine Meyers, MD and others from the NIH, and Leah Tuzzio, MPH and James Fraser from KPWHRI and others from Duke University’s Clinical Research Institute.

 


May 23, 2017

Immigrant and Refugees Health Disparities: Somali Community’s Overview

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Presenter: Ahmed Ali, PharmD, Executive Director, Somali Health Board

Summary

King County has a reputation as one the healthiest regions in the nation, but underneath that status lie significant disparities within minority, immigrant and refugee communities. The more than 30,000 Somali immigrants and refugees in King County face tremendous challenges. Consumed with issues of survival and resettlement, new arrivals are focused on finding adequate housing, overcoming trauma and loss, coping with cultural adjustment and learning English.

Much like other new immigrants and refugees, Somali immigrants and refugees have substantial health concerns. At the same time they experience significant barriers to accessing health resources, including unfamiliarity and distrust of the U.S. health care system, lack of language and cultural responsiveness from providers, and competing priorities—particularly given challenges meeting basic, life-sustaining daily needs. This presentation will cover general information on the Somali population in King County, barriers to health care, and Somali Health Board’s roles in addressing these challenges in partnership with the health systems.

Coffee and tea will be served.

 


May 9, 2017

Amazing ‘Race’: Team NLP/VDW to unmask unknown race/ethnicity

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

Speakers

  • Jane Grafton, Programmer, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
  • David Cronkite, Programmer, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
  • Onchee Yu, Biostatistician, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Summary
Race and ethnicity is an important risk factor on many health conditions. At KPWHRI, we often rely on VDW demographics table to collect race/ethnicity data. Depending on the study years, the amount of missingness in race/ethnicity in the study cohort could be large. In our study of estimating a 10-year incidence of uterine fibroid that varies by race/ethnicity, we utilized NLP to supplement unknown race/ethnicity from VDW. We’ll discuss the NLP development process, and how the resulting race/ethnicity data from the two data sources compared.

Coffee and tea will be provided.

 


April 28, 2017

Compelling Science Storytelling: A Pacific Northwest Workshop for Science Communicators

A one-day workshop and networking opportunity in Seattle

WhereFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, Wash.

This is a one-day workshop and networking opportunity in Seattle for science communicators and public information officers.

The regional conference is supported by the National Association of Science Writers and hosted by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute is proud to be a co-sponsor of this event. Other organizers include science writers and public information specialists from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PATH, Public Health–Seattle & King County, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, University of Washington, and Washington Global Health Alliance.

The workshop has proven so popular the event has reached capacity, so registrations are now closed.

Read more on the Workshop Program page. Questions? Contact: storytelling2017@nwscience.org. Follow on Twitter at @scistories17

 


April 25, 2017

Accelerating Research in a Learning Health Care System: An Overview and Exemplars of VA’s Quality Enhancement Research Initiative

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

PresentersKathy Bradley, MD, PhD, Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute; John Fortney, PhD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Health, Adjunct Professor, Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington; Christian Helfrich, PhD, MPH, Research Associate Professor, Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington 

Abstract
The VA has supported rapid implementation of research into clinical practice since 1998 when the Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) was formed. KPWHRI’s own Kathy Bradley will describe QUERI’s early structure and impact (1998-2011).  With the passage of the Choice Act in 2014, the QUERI was transformed to support a Learning Health Care System by aligning science and funding with clinical priorities identified through strategic planning. Two principal investigators from the VA in Puget Sound will provide an overview on the new structure and drill down into their recently funded QUERI programs to reveal how rigorous evaluation and scientific testing of implementation strategies can reduce care quality variability and improve population health. John Fortney will describe the Virtual Specialty Care QUERI Program: Implementing and Evaluating Technology Facilitated Clinical Interventions to Improve Access to High Quality Specialty Care for Rural Veterans. Christian Helfrich will describe the Improving Safety and Quality through Evidence-Based De-Implementation of Ineffective Diagnostics and Therapeutics program. This session will be followed by a KPWHRI internal discussion of how we might pull from the QUERI structure and exemplars to enhance our own Learning Health Care System (date TBD).

 


April 11, 2017

The Learning to Integrate Neighborhoods and Clinical Care (LINCC Project): Creating a New Role in Primary Care Teams to Engage Patients and Communities in Addressing the Social Determinants of Health

Where: Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 4–5 p.m., Room 1509A

PresenterClarissa Hsu, PhD, Assistant Investigator, Center for Community Health and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, and other members of the LINCC team

Abstract
We will report on our experiences and results implementing the LINCC project. The project aims were to:

  1. develop, implement, and evaluate intense involvement of patients in the design of a new primary care role to link patients to community resources;
  2. design and pilot the new role of in clinics;
  3. and conduct a robust evaluation of the implementation of the role.

Patient involvement in the design of the Community Resource Specialist (CRS) role was evaluated using observation of design events, interviews and surveys of participants, and interviews of health system leaders. Implementation and impact of the CRS role was evaluated using data from staff interviews, patient focus groups, clinic site visits, patient surveys, documentation from the electronic health record (EHR) and administrative data.

This presentation will highlight our findings and explore the benefits and challenges of designing, implementing and evaluating interventions in real world settings. We found that involving patients as partners in designing the new role for primary care was well-received by both patients and health system representatives. The new CRS role earned high patient satisfaction scores. Patients who used the CRS services and participated in focus groups reported behavior changes and improved health, although no changes were detected in the patient survey data. Our experiences addressing the challenges and limitations we encountered provide valuable lessons regarding research-delivery system partnerships and ways to improve the design and evaluation of clinic-based interventions to address social determinants of health going forward. 

 


March 28, 2017

Do Complete Streets Policies Cause Bike Fatalities while Decreasing Cyclist Fatality Risk?

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Room 1509A, 4–5 p.m.

Presenter: Steve Mooney, PhD, completed a PhD in epidemiology at Columbia University in 2016. His substantive research focuses on built environment determinants of physical activity and injury, but he aspires to be an epidemiology methodologist as well.

Abstract

"Complete Streets" policies requiring transportation engineers to make provisions for pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users may make cycling safer for each cyclist while increasing overall fatalities by encouraging cycling. We estimate the impact of Complete Streets on cyclist fatality rates, using the parametric g-formula to account for the size of the cycling population under different levels of exposure.

Coffee and tea will be provided.


March 15, 2017

Families as Consumers: Impact of Strategies to Increase Insurance Coverage and Contain Costs

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Room 1509A, 3–4 p.m.

Presenter: Alison Galbraith, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute

Abstract

There has been an increasing movement in recent years to promote consumerism in health care. As part of the ACA, health insurance exchanges provide a marketplace for families to shop for coverage and compare plan options based on price, network, and other attributes. So-called consumer-directed health plans with high deductibles have become increasingly prevalent as a means to provide affordable coverage options and contain costs. Price transparency has been promoted by states and payers in an attempt to provide information for patients to make cost-conscious decisions. This talk will explore evidence on the impact of these strategies on family decision making, health care use, and will assess the degree to which families behave as consumers related to health care.

Coffee and tea will be provided.


March 14, 2017

Evaluation of Group Health Risk Reduction Initiatives for Chronic Opioid Therapy Patients (2006-2014): Use of survey, EHR, and state records data for controlled evaluation of health plan initiatives

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Room 1509A, 4–5 p.m.

Presenter: Michael Von Korff, ScD, Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Abstract

We will report results of an evaluation of two major initiatives in the Group Health Integrated Group Practice (GH-IGP) to reduce risks among Chronic Opioid Therapy (COT) patients: (1) dose reduction implemented in mid-2007; and, (2) risk stratification and closer monitoring, implemented in Fall, 2010. The comparison group was COT patients from Group Health Contracted Care (GH-CC) clinics. Using interrupted time series methods, with 22,673 GH-IGP COT patients and 8,469 GH-CC COT patients, we examined adverse events, including opioid overdose (fatal and non-fatal), motor vehicle accidents ascertained with Department of Motor Vehicle records, and medically attended injuries. Using a telephone survey of prevalent COT patients using opioids regularly in GH-IGP or GH-CC for at least one year in 2014-15, we assessed pain severity, perceptions of opioid helpfulness, prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder assessed according to DSM5 criteria, and perceptions of doctor-patient collaboration pertaining to opioid management.

Survey data assessed differences in pain outcomes and problems with opioids comparing COT patients exposed to both risk reduction initiatives (N=935 COT patients from GH-IGP) or to neither health plan risk reduction initiative (N=653 COT patients from GH-CC). This evaluation demonstrates the potential for evaluation of major health plan initiatives using a combination of longitudinal electronic health care data and state records, and cross-sectional survey data. While this evaluation was conducted comparing Group Health Integrated Group Practice and Contracted Care settings, these methods would be well suited to evaluations comparing process and outcome changes over time for quality improvement initiatives implemented in one Kaiser region but not in another Kaiser region serving comparable patients.

Coffee and tea will be provided.


February 28, 2017

Actions and processes that patients, family members, and physicians associate with patient- and family-centered care

Group Health Research Institute, Room 1509A, 4–5 p.m.

Presenter: Clarissa Hsu, PhD, Group Health Research Institute Assistant Investigator

Abstract

Promoting patient- and family -centered care has become increasingly important in health care. However, the specific actions and/or processes needed to achieve this type of care are unclear, particularly in ambulatory, primary care environments.

To fill this knowledge gap, we conducted focus groups with patients, family members, and physicians in three major U.S. cities to elicit specific actions that health care teams can take to provide optimal patient- and family-centered care (PFCC). We identified a detailed list of specific actions that patients, family members, and physicians associate with PFCC.

This paper elaborates on actions associated with the core concepts of dignity and respect—terms often referred to, but that have been difficult to operationalize. Our work is a critical step toward identifying and measuring PFCC in ambulatory care settings. Applications of our findings include supporting research on whether PFCC affects clinical outcomes, and developing innovative PFCC-oriented policies to support PFCC.

Coffee and tea will be provided.


February 14, 2017

Advancing from the activated patient to the autonomous patient in chronic illness care

Group Health Research Institute, Room 1509A, 4–5 p.m.

Presenter: Mark Daniel Sullivan M.D., UW Medicine

Abstract

It is recognized that patients play a central role in chronic illness care, but the concept of health behavior retards innovation. We seek not just an activated patient, but an autonomous patient who sets and pursues her own vital goals. To fully enlist patients, we must bridge the gap between impersonal disease processes and personal processes. This requires understanding how the roots of patient autonomy lie in the biological autonomy that allows organisms to carve their biological niche. It is time for us to recognize the patient as the primary customer for health care and the primary producer of health. Patient agency is both the primary means and primary end of health care.

Bio

Dr. Mark Sullivan received his M.D. and his PhD in Philosophy from Vanderbilt University. After completing an internship in Family Medicine at University of Missouri, he completed a residency in Psychiatry at the University of Washington in 1988. He is now Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences as well as Adjunct Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington.

Dr. Sullivan has served as attending physician in the UW Center for Pain Relief for more than 25 years, where he is Co-Director of Behavioral Health Services. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed articles. He has been chair of the Ethics Committee of the American Pain Society and on the editorial board of Pain. He has a new book from Oxford University Press titled, "The Patient as Agent of Health and Health Care."

Coffee and tea will be provided.

KP_Map_icon_kp-blue_120px.png

   Find Us

Map and directions to KPWHRI

Research Communications

How to make a picture worth 1,000 words: Effectively communicating your research results using statistical graphics

July 25, 2017

Presenters: 

  • Mike Jackson, Associate Scientific Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

  • Yates Coley, Assistant Scientific Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Enlightened Aging

Book reading & signing—Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life by Eric B. Larson

July 25, 2017

Join Dr. Eric B. Larson in person to hear passages from his new book.

Third Place Books at Lake Forest Park Town Center, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., Lake Forest Park, Wash., 7 p.m.

 

Enlightened Aging

Book reading & signing—Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for Long, Active Life by Eric B. Larson

Aug. 16, 2017

Join Dr. Eric B. Larson in person to hear passages from his new book.

The Elliott Bay Book Company, Seattle Wash., 7 p.m.

Aug. 17, 2017

Join Dr. Eric B. Larson in person to hear passages from his new book.

Queen Anne Book Company, Seattle Wash., 7 p.m.