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KPWHRI in the Media

 

News media often cover Kaiser Permanente Washington research.
Here are selected mentions.

 

KIRO 7's Angela Russell (left) interviews KPWHRI's Paula Lozano, MD, MPH, in our Seattle offices.

2017


March 1–31

Peer-reviewed clinical study shows ID Genomics’ bacterial fingerprinting technology can reduce prescription errors and antibiotic overuse at the point-of-care

Read news release.

Delia Scholes, PhD, and KPWA’s Kim Riddell, MD, are helping to develop and test bacteria “fingerprinting” technology from ID Genomics, which may improve the speed and accuracy of identifying bacterial strains and choosing the best treatment in the exam room:


Chronic illness management

Michael Parchman, MD, MPH, is quoted about a KPWHRI and University of Washington study to address prescribing patterns and try to minimize unnecessary painkiller use at sites including Virginia Mason Memorial hospital’s primary care clinics:


Plain language in research

Jessica Ridpath was interviewed about a trend toward less readability in scientific articles:


Mindfulness meditation eases low back pain

Read news release.

Prior KPWHRI research on meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management is highlighted in a report on a new study that suggests reading has similar effects on the brain to CBT:


February 1–28

‘Dense breasts’ eclipse all other known breast cancer risk factors

Read news release.

Diana Miglioretti, PhD, co-wrote a paper showing that women in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium whose breasts are mainly glandular, rather than fat, have more risk of breast cancer. This risk exceeds the impact of other population-level risks, such as family history of breast cancer, personal history of benign lesions, and first full-term pregnancy after age 30:


Cardiovascular disease-related hospital admissions jump on second day after major snowfall

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Jennifer Bobb, PhD, continued to be quoted about her finding, conducted while at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, that more hospitalizations for heart disease tend to follow snowstorms, which are becoming more common with global climate change:


January 1–31

Cardiovascular disease-related hospital admissions jump on second day after major snowfall

Read news release.

Jennifer Bobb, PhD, was quoted about her finding, conducted while at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, that more hospitalizations for heart disease tend to follow snowstorms, which are becoming more common with global climate change:


Patient involvement in research as coinvestigators

Janice Tufte describes her years-long involvement as a coinvestigator with the Learning to Integrate Neighborhoods with Clinical Care (LINCC) project:


Vaccines & infectious disease

Lisa Jackson, MD, MPH, comments on research by others on the effectiveness of mandatory influenza vaccine policies:

For the media

Are you a member of the news media?

Our goal is to make your job easier. We can quickly arrange for you to interview our scientists about their research or the work of others. We can also provide news releases, photographs, videos, and backgrounders—and access to patients who participate in our research and would like to be interviewed. 

About Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI), formerly Group Health Research Institute, improves the health and health care of Kaiser Permanente members and the public. The Institute has conducted nonproprietary public-interest research on preventing, diagnosing, and treating major health problems since 1983. Government and private research grants provide our main funding. Follow KPWHRI research on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn, or YouTube. For more information, go to: www.kpwashingtonresearch.org.


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