Andrea J. Cook, PhD

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“National interest in using data to improve patient care and safety is growing. Our group is developing the biostatistical methods for that work.”

Andrea J. Cook, PhD

Senior Biostatistics Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Andrea.J.Cook@kp.org
206-287-4257

Biography

Andrea Cook, PhD, is a biostatistician whose work focuses on leveraging available data such as electronic health records (EHRs) to efficiently address important public health questions and improve the overall health of our population. Dr. Cook has developed research methods using EHRs and other existing health care data for major initiatives led by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Her work spans many areas, including hypertension control, cancer screening, obesity, diabetes, built environment, and alternative medicine for pain.

The goal of Dr. Cook’s research is finding interventions that improve patient care. She studies how pragmatic clinical trials, which are conducted under real-world conditions in health care organizations such as Kaiser Permanente Washington, can deliver more effective care and improve patient outcomes. Dr. Cook is a lead biostatistician for the Biostatistics and Study Design Core of the NIH Collaboratory, which facilitates the implementation of pragmatic clinical trials. She addresses the numerous statistical challenges of pragmatic clinical trials including how to design studies to answer research questions without impeding the delivery of care and how to use EHRs for more cost-effective studies.

Dr. Cook also studies how to use EHR data to improve the way we monitor the safety of new medical products including vaccines, drugs, and medical devices. She contributes to the FDA Sentinel Initiative and the CDC Vaccine Safety Datalink and has led the development of new statistical methods for actively monitoring medical products for rare adverse events using distributed data networks.

Dr. Cook obtained her PhD in biostatistics from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 2005. She is a member of the American Statistical Association and the Western North American Region of the International Biometric Society. She is also an affiliate professor in biostatistics at the University of Washington.

Research interests and experience

Recent publications

Carney PA, Aiello Bowles EJ, Sickles EA, Geller BM, Feig SA, Jackson S, Brown D, Cook A, Yankaskas BC, Miglioretti DL, Elmore JG. Using a tailored web-based intervention to set goals to reduce unnecessary recall. Acad Radiol. 2011 Apr;18(4):495-503. Epub 2011 Jan 20. PubMed

Green BB, Anderson ML, Ralston JD, Catz S, Fishman PA, Cook AJ. Patient ability and willingness to participate in a web-based intervention to improve hypertension control. J Med Internet Res. 2011 Jan 20;13(1):e1. PubMed

Carney PA, Geller BM, Sickles EA, Miglioretti DL, Aiello Bowles EJ, Abraham L, Feig SA, Brown D, Cook AJ, Yankaskas BC, Elmore JG. Feasibility and satisfaction with a tailored web-based audit intervention for recalibrating radiologists' thresholds for conducting additional work-up. Acad Radiol. 2011 Mar;18(3):369-76. Epub 2010 Dec 30. PubMed

Onega T, Cook A, Kirlin B, Buist D, Tuzzio L. PS3-16: the influence of travel time on breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Clin Med Res. 2010;8(3-4):196. PubMed

 

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