Sascha Dublin, MD, PhD

“My work helps women and doctors know which medications are safe during pregnancy.”

Sascha Dublin, MD, PhD

Associate Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
Physician, Washington Permanente Medical Group, Internal Medicine

Biography

Sascha Dublin’s main interest is studying the impact of therapeutic interventions, including medications, using real-world observational data. Through this work she aims to provide patients and health care providers with better information about the risks and benefits of different treatment options so they can make more informed decisions. Her work includes studies of medication use in relation to pneumonia risk and dementia risk in older adults. She seeks to improve the methods used to study drug safety in older adults by exploring biases that may arise when observational studies do not take into account coexisting illnesses and functional and cognitive status.

Dr. Dublin’s research also focuses on the outcomes of common interventions in pregnancy, including elective induction of labor (that is, bringing on labor when there is not a medical or obstetrical reason for immediate delivery). Her goal is to take advantage of the rich clinical data that are becoming increasingly available through electronic medical records to develop new knowledge and improve care. Dr. Dublin holds an R01 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study maternal and infant outcomes after elective induction of labor at term gestation. She is also the Kaiser Permanente Washington principal investigator for the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program funded by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Dr. Dublin’s methodological interests include epidemiologic methods, such as case-control studies and techniques to measure and control for potential confounding factors. She has experience with two-phase study designs and has led methods-focused workgroups for the FDA’s Mini-Sentinel Initiative. She is also interested in novel methods to extract information from clinical records, such as natural language processing.

Dr. Dublin collaborates with the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI)’s aging and immunization research teams, and her experience includes work with the Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, a joint division of KPWHRI and the University of Washington. She previously held a five-year Paul B. Beeson Career Development Award in Aging Research. She is a board-certified general internist who sees patients one day a week in primary care at Kaiser Permanente Washington.

Research interests and experience 

Recent publications

Jackson ML, Walker R, Lee S, Larson E, Dublin S. Reply to: quality indicators of drug use and the risk of pneumonia in older adults without dementia. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Feb 7. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14736. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Figueroa Gray M, Hsu C, Kiel L, Dublin S. "It's a very big burden on me": women's experiences using insulin for gestational diabetes. Matern Child Health J. 2017 Jan 13. doi: 10.1007/s10995-017-2261-8. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Hansen RN, Walker RL, Shortreed SM, Dublin S, Saunders K, Ludman EJ, Von Korff M. Impact of an opioid risk reduction initiative on motor vehicle crash risk among chronic opioid therapy patients. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Nov 14. doi: 10.1002/pds.4130. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Wallace ER, Siscovick DS, Sitlani CM, Dublin S, Mitchell P, Robbins JA, Fink HA, Cauley JA, Buzkova P, Carbone L, Chen Z, Heckbert SR. Incident atrial fibrillation and the risk of fracture in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Osteoporos Int. 2016 Oct 7. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

 

KPWHRI In the Media

Group Health’s guidelines helped our Group Practice reduce doses of opioids for chronic pain

Pain Point: Taking the Opioid Addiction Problem Seriously

Seattle Magazine, Sept. 2016

healthy findings blog

Tough conversations: How can we help patients get off risky drugs?

Dr. Sascha Dublin describes a Group Health-UW finding that benzodiazepines probably don’t cause dementia. But she cautions that they’re still bad for you.

Read it in Healthy Findings.

Healthy Findings Blog

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14.8 years separates the life expectancies of the poorest one percent and the richest one percent.

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HealthDay (syndicated), Mar. 3, 2015