test

KPWHRI in the Media 2017

 

News media often cover Kaiser Permanente Washington research.
Here are selected mentions.

 

KIRO 7's Angela Russell (left) interviews KPWHRI's Paula Lozano, MD, MPH, in our Seattle offices.

2017


December 1–31

Flucasting week 8: Predicting influenza severity

Read story.

Michael Jackson, PhD, is quoted in three recent news reports: on the importance of getting vaccinated against the flu; his forecasting of the course of this flu season; and how effective flu vaccines tend to be from one year to another:


Aging & Geriatrics

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, wrote an editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine about a review of research that found no magic bullet for preventing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, and he was quoted in these news stories:


Obesity

David Arterburn, MD, MPH, is quoted in two stories on the medical case for bariatric surgery for people with obesity:


U.S. Preventive Services Task Force finds insufficient evidence for routine hormone therapy for primary prevention of chronic conditions in women

Read recommendation statement.

Task Force chair David C. Grossman, MD, MPH, is quoted:


November 1–30

Our study tests new way to reduce ‘vaccine hesitancy’

Read our news release.

Parent volunteers who value immunization show promise as advocates to help protect communities against contagious diseases. Study principal investigator Clarissa Hsu, PhD, and KPWHRI Adjunct Researcher John Dunn, MD, MPH, are quoted in this article:


Kaiser Permanente researchers explore patients’ marijuana use

Read our news release.

Routinely asking about cannabis use can better serve patients by helping clinicians start conversations about risks and benefits, according to a study led by Gwen Lapham, PhD, featured here:


Our guidelines helped our Group Practice reduce doses of opioids for chronic pain

Read blog post.

Roughly 8 million Americans are on long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain, and as many as a million are taking dangerously high doses, said Michael Von Korff, ScD:


10 things you can do to prevent devastating falls

Read our story.

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, was interviewed on preventing falls after writing an editorial that accompanied research by others in JAMA:


Our tobacco cessation research is smoking hot

Read story.

Jennifer McClure, PhD, is interviewed on her research to design more helpful tools to help people quit smoking. She talks about the struggles that smokers face when quitting—and highlights two methods that dramatically increase the chances of success: behavioral counseling and smoking cessation medications:


Health Services & Economics

As part of an article he published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Greg Simon, MD, MPH, appeared in a short video, which was also posted on the first webpage of the NIH Collaboratory Living Textbook of Pragmatic Clinical Trials. And Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, discusses how working effectively with a health care system can maximize the chances of running a successful pragmatic trial:


October 1–31

Complementary & Integrative Health

Daniel C. Cherkin, PhD, was interviewed in a story about how exercise may be the best treatment for back pain. He calls back pain the “poster child” for “overmedicalization”:


Enlightened Aging book

Read about the book.

This feature story profiles Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, his research on aging co-leading the joint University of Washington-Kaiser Permanente Washington Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, and his new book Enlightened Aging:

  • Close Up: The People of SPH (University of Washington School of Public Health), October 2017
    Close up: Eric Larson

Aging & Geriatrics

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, is interviewed in a story about two recent reports on dementia: one from the Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention, Intervention, and Care; and the other from a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Larson was a member of both the Lancet and National Academies committees:


September 1–30

Complementary and Integrative Health

Daniel C. Cherkin, PhD, discusses his finding that both mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive behavioral therapy proved more effective than “usual care” in relieving chronic low back pain and improving patients’ function:


Enlightened Aging book

Read about the book.

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, discusses his new book, Enlightened Aging, and how a better old age is within reach for many of us, thanks to resilience, which he defines as “the capacity to adapt and grow stronger in the face of adversity and stress”:


Cancer

Karen Wernli, PhD, and her patient partner Dianne Johnson were interviewed about successful engagement of patients in research:


Vaccines and Infectious Diseases

Michael Jackson, PhD, MPH, was interviewed about his New England Journal of Medicine article about why the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), FluMist, performed poorly in the United States during the 2015-16 flu season but well in Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom:


August 1–31

Aging and Geriatrics

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, was interviewed about research by others on how people who spend less time in deep, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep may be more likely to develop dementia than are those who get better-quality sleep:


Vaccines and Infectious Diseases

Michael Jackson, PhD, was interviewed about his New England Journal of Medicine study on flu vaccine effectiveness and problems with the inhaled vaccine in children:


Meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy pay off for back pain

Read blog post.

Daniel Cherkin, PhD, led a study showing that cognitive behavioral therapy is likely to be cost-effective, and mindfulness-based stress reduction to be cost-saving, for back pain:


July 1–31

Suicide prevention: The answers are within reach

Read feature story.

Gregory Simon, MD, MPH, was interviewed about a study that identified physical health conditions that were associated with a higher rate of suicide:


Aging and geriatrics

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, discussed the scientific research into healthy aging that went into his new book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for a Long, Healthy Life:


U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says evidence recommends against routine screening for ovarian cancer

Read recommendation statement.

USPSTF chair David Grossman, MD, MPH, was quoted about a draft recommendation against ovarian cancer screening for women with no signs or symptoms and who are not at high risk for the disease:


CCHE helps communities show measurable change

Read story.

Maggie Jones, MPH, co-wrote this blog post about KPWHRI’s Center for Community Health and Evaluation (CCHE) assessment of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky’s Promoting Responsive Health Policy. It was adapted from a post she co-wrote earlier for the Health Affairs blog:


June 1–30

Ed Wagner

Read his profile page.

Various Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) staffers, including Don Berwick, MD, MPP, IHI president emeritus, wrote this tribute to Edward H. Wagner, MD, MPH—with a video from Dr. Berwick:


U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says evidence recommends screening children for obesity

Read recommendation statement.

David Grossman, MD, MPH, chairs the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and was quoted about recommendations on screening children for obesity:


Advancing community health improvement with ‘population dose’

Read blog.

Information graphic features KPWHRI’s Center for Community Health and Evaluation’s population dose toolkit:


CCHE helps communities show measurable change

Read story.

Maggie Jones, MPH, co-wrote this blog post about KPWHRI’s Center for Community Health and Evaluation (CCHE) assessment of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky’s Promoting Responsive Health Policy:


Vaccines and Infectious Diseases

Kaiser Permanente Washington is participating new way to test bacteria and match them to antibiotics faster:


May 1–31

Kaiser Permanente study tests new way to reduce ‘vaccine hesitancy’

Read news release.

Clarissa Hsu, PhD, is quoted about her testing a new way to approach parents who are hesitant to have their children vaccinated: training parents who vaccinate their children to talk, in a positive way, about why they value vaccines:


Mindfulness meditation eases low back pain

Read news release.

The opioid crisis is forcing doctors to change how they treat chronic pain, putting a new emphasis on nondrug remedies and psychological interventions, according to Dan Cherkin, PhD:


Group Health’s guidelines helped our Group Practice reduce doses of opioids for chronic pain

Read blog post.

Seeking to curb an alarming rise in inappropriate use of opioids, Kaiser Permanente Washington began an initiative in 2015 to lower the highest opioid doses among its patients while more closely following all of its patients who take opioids. Michael Von Korff, ScD, led a PCORI-funded study on the initiative that found it has successfully lowered patients’ average opioid dose:


April 1–30

Kaiser Permanente study tests new way to reduce ‘vaccine hesitancy’

Read news release.

Clarissa Hsu, PhD, is quoted in this story about her work with Jennie Schoeppe, MPH, MS; Allen Cheadle, PhD; Creagh Miller, MPH; and Juno Matthys. They tested a new way to approach parents who are hesitant to have their children vaccinated: training parents who vaccinate their children to talk, in a positive way, about why they value vaccines:


Vaccines and Infectious Diseases

Seattle startup ID Genomics has developed technology to identify bacteria in just 30 minutes, a leap forward for identifying and treating infections effectively and more efficiently. Sites including KP Washington participated in a 2014 study that validated the technology’s capabilities.Delia Scholes, PhD, and Kim Riddell, MD, coauthored an article that this story refers to:


Mindfulness meditation eases chronic low back pain

Read news release.

For some patients with chronic back pain, computerized phone therapy might work just as well at easing symptoms as in-person visits with a therapist, a small study suggests. Daniel Cherkin, PhD, comments on cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain:


Health information technology

A recent study looked into whether patients would be more willing to share medical information with family members if certain details in the notes—for example, about substance abuse—could be restricted depending on who is looking at them. James Ralston, MD, MPH, commented:


Mental Health

A large-scale analysis suggests that up to half of those who take an antidepressant don't benefit very much from it—and sometimes not at all. Now there’s new evidence suggesting that a nondrug treatment should be tried first. Gregory Simon, MD, MPH, comments on cognitive behavioral therapy:


March 1–31

Peer-reviewed clinical study shows ID Genomics’ bacterial fingerprinting technology can reduce prescription errors and antibiotic overuse at the point-of-care

Read news release.

Delia Scholes, PhD, and KPWA’s Kim Riddell, MD, are helping to develop and test bacteria “fingerprinting” technology from ID Genomics, which may improve the speed and accuracy of identifying bacterial strains and choosing the best treatment in the exam room:


Chronic Illness Management

Michael Parchman, MD, MPH, is quoted about a KPWHRI and University of Washington study to address prescribing patterns and try to minimize unnecessary painkiller use at sites including Virginia Mason Memorial hospital’s primary care clinics:


Plain language in research

Jessica Ridpath was interviewed about a trend toward less readability in scientific articles:


Mindfulness meditation eases low back pain

Read news release.

Prior KPWHRI research on meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management is highlighted in a report on a new study that suggests reading has similar effects on the brain to CBT:


February 1–28

‘Dense breasts’ eclipse all other known breast cancer risk factors

Read news release.

Diana Miglioretti, PhD, co-wrote a paper showing that women in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium whose breasts are mainly glandular, rather than fat, have more risk of breast cancer. This risk exceeds the impact of other population-level risks, such as family history of breast cancer, personal history of benign lesions, and first full-term pregnancy after age 30:


Cardiovascular disease-related hospital admissions jump on second day after major snowfall

Read news release.

Jennifer Bobb, PhD, continued to be quoted about her finding, conducted while at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, that more hospitalizations for heart disease tend to follow snowstorms, which are becoming more common with global climate change:


January 1–31

Cardiovascular disease-related hospital admissions jump on second day after major snowfall

Read news release.

Jennifer Bobb, PhD, was quoted about her finding, conducted while at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, that more hospitalizations for heart disease tend to follow snowstorms, which are becoming more common with global climate change:


Patient involvement in research as coinvestigators

Janice Tufte describes her years-long involvement as a coinvestigator with the Learning to Integrate Neighborhoods with Clinical Care (LINCC) project:


Vaccines & Infectious Diseases

Lisa Jackson, MD, MPH, comments on research by others on the effectiveness of mandatory influenza vaccine policies:

For the media

Are you a member of the news media?

Our goal is to make your job easier. We can quickly arrange for you to interview our scientists about their research or the work of others. We can also provide news releases, photographs, videos, and backgrounders—and access to patients who participate in our research and would like to be interviewed. 


Some links may require a subscription to view the content. Please check the terms and conditions on these websites and follow their rules to avoid violating copyright law when visiting them. We can’t provide you with copies of articles.

About Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute

Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) improves the health and health care of Kaiser Permanente members and the public. The Institute has conducted nonproprietary public-interest research on preventing, diagnosing, and treating major health problems since 1983. Government and private research grants provide our main funding. Follow KPWHRI research on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or YouTube. For more information, go to: www.kpwashingtonresearch.org.

About Kaiser Permanente 

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: kp.org/share.