Vaccines & Infectious Diseases

“We’re improving the benefits of vaccination programs at every step—from identifying high-risk populations that benefit from vaccines, to clinical trials of experimental vaccines, to post-marketing studies of vaccine safety and effectiveness.”

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute Associate Investigator

Research overview

Vaccines save lives by protecting people against infectious diseases such as polio, measles, and viral hepatitis. But recently, particularly in the Northwest, people have delayed or refused vaccination because of safety fears, leading to local outbreaks of potentially deadly diseases like whooping cough. Kaiser Permanente Washington is working to protect communities by continually improving the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

Kaiser Permanente Washington research projects on vaccines and infectious diseases include:

  • clinical trials of promising vaccines and infectious disease treatments by the Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) led by Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) Senior Investigator and Washington Permanente Medical Group physician Lisa A. Jackson, MD, MPH, and funded through 2023 by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;
  • ongoing monitoring of influenza vaccination by the U.S. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network, led by Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH, KPWHRI Associate Investigator, and funded by the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and
  • studies of immunization safety through the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) Project, supported by the CDC and connecting information in large databases maintained by eight American health plans including Kaiser Permanente Washington.

Successes over three decades of KPWHRI research on vaccine safety and effectiveness include:

  • a large study of flu vaccination in seniors that found that the vaccine might not protect them from pneumonia as well as hoped;
  • finding that nasal spray vaccine did not prevent flu effectively in young children in recent seasons;
  • clinical trials of flu vaccines, including ones against pandemic flu and bird flu, in adults;
  • the biggest retrospective study of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine effectiveness in adults and the largest clinical trial on the safety of this vaccine;
  • the first clinical trial of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults; and
  • pneumococcal vaccine studies in which Kaiser Permanente Washington participants helped improve adult vaccination strategies nationwide.

“Kaiser Permanente Washington gives us nearly unlimited potential to address vaccine effectiveness and safety questions of national and international importance," says Lisa Jackson, MD, MPH, a KPWHRI senior investigator and Washington Permanente Medical Group physician. "We benefit from data for the Kaiser Permanente Washington population, the experience of our multidisciplinary immunization research group, and the encouraging atmosphere for research at Kaiser Permanente Washington.”

Recent publications on Vaccines & Infectious Disease

Opel DJ, Zhou C, Robinson JD, Henrikson N, Lepere K, Mangione-Smith R, Taylor JA. Impact of the childhood vaccine discussion format over time on immunization status. Acad Pediatr. 2018 Jan 8. pii: S1876-2859(18)30001-9. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.12.009. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Widdice LE, Unger ER, Panicker G, Hoagland R, Callahan ST, Jackson LA, Berry AA, Kotloff K, Frey SE, Harrison CJ, Pahud BA, Edwards KM, Mulligan MJ, Sudman J, Bernstein DI. Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving two or three quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine doses at standard and prolonged intervals. Vaccine. 2018 Jan 3. pii: S0264-410X(17)31795-4. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.12.042. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Jackson LA, El Sahly HM, George S, Winokur P, Edwards K, Brady RC, Rouphael N, Keitel WA, Mulligan MJ, Burton RL, Nakamura A, Ferreria J, Nahm MH. Randomized clinical trial of a single versus a double dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in adults 55 through 74 years of age previously vaccinated with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Vaccine. 2017 Dec 23. pii: S0264-410X(17)31822-4. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.12.061. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Storms AD, Chen J, Jackson LA, Nordin JD, Naleway AL, Glanz JM, Jacobsen SJ, Weintraub ES, Klein NP, Gargiullo PM, Fry AM. Rates and risk factors associated with hospitalization for pneumonia with ICU admission among adults. BMC Pulm Med. 2017;17(1):208. doi: 10.1186/s12890-017-0552-x. PubMed

Jackson ML, Phillips CH, Benoit J, Kiniry E, Madziwa L, Nelson JC, Jackson LA. The impact of selection bias on vaccine effectiveness estimates from test-negative studies. Vaccine. 2017 Dec 15. pii: S0264-410X(17)31775-9. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.12.022. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Researchers in Vaccines & Infectious Disease

Lisa A. Jackson, MD, MPH

Senior Investigator
206-442-5216
jackson.l@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Jennifer C. Nelson, PhD

Director of Biostatistics; Senior Investigator
206-287-2004
nelson.jl@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Michael L. Jackson, PhD, MPH

Associate Investigator
206-287-2220
jackson.ml@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Andrea J. Cook, PhD

Senior Investigator
206-287-4257
cook.aj@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Delia Scholes, PhD

Senior Investigator
206-287-2888
scholes.d@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Sascha Dublin, MD, PhD

Associate Investigator
206-287-2870
dublin.s@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Onchee Yu, MS

Senior Biostatistician
206-287-2389
yu.o@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Robert D. Wellman, MS

Biostatistician
206-287-2557
wellman.r@ghc.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Affiliate researchers

Doug Opel, MD, MPH
University of Washington (UW) Department of Bioethics and Humanities; UW Department of Pediatrics; UW Medical Center

Adjunct researchers

John Dunn, MD, MPH
Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington

Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington Family Practice;
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute